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AU comes to Cameroon’s rescue with FCFA 12 billion humanitarian aid

The African Union (AU) Commission has promised to assist the Government of Cameroon in the execution of the FCFA 12 billion humanitarian aid to the hundreds of thousands of internally displaced persons and refugees born out of the on-going Anglophone Conflict.

The announcement was made Tuesday, September 4 by the AU Ambassador to Cameroon, Jean Gérard Mezui M’ella, during a visit to the Prime Minister, Philemon who launched the humanitarian plan in June.

Jean Gérard Mezui M’ella, AU representative to Cameroon

The Ambassador came to confirm the AU’s support to the humanitarian plan following a previous request made by the Government of Cameroon soliciting the assistance of the continental body.

This follows promises made by the AU Commissioner, Moussa Faki Mahamat, when he visited Cameroon in July this year. In the course of the visit the Chairman declared that his body upholds the unity and invisibility of Cameroon, and he also promised to support Government’s efforts in managing the conflict.

Since the launching of the humanitarian plan in June for victims of the Anglophone Conflict, the Government seems to be facing huge challenges of raising the funds and it is largely depending on foreign assistance to make the deal.

Recently, President Paul Biya has also presented the dire situation to the Chinese President in the course of the China Africa Summit in Beijing. Just like the AU, the Chinese Government has also weigh in its support for the project.

The lack of funds by the Government can be explain in the fact that very little about the much heralded humanitarian aid has been seen on the ground. And in rare situations, coordination has been a huge problem as even those who have not been directly affected by the violence are benefiting from the aid.

Some of it has also ended in the hands of the military. Moreover, schools which the Government promised to rebuild before the opening of the 2018/2019 academic year are still lying in ruins with most of them embedded in thick vegetation after two years of no activity.

©THE NATIONAL TIMES NEWS